Namibia Part 2: Dune 45

The next morning we were on the road again, with great views along the way.

And soon we arrived to the edge of the Namib Desert.

First up was Dune 45, so-named because it was 45km down the road from the park entrance.

It really was a huge dune, and it took an hour to climb it all the way.

The views were breathtaking!

It was a little more work than we thought to get to the top!

It was fun to periodically look back and see how far we’d come.

And to watch people play in the sand, which felt really safe to fall into!

The wind was constantly blowing the very fine sand in one direction. I remember wondering why the dune didn’t just disappear – but I’m sure there’s a perfectly rational explanation for it!

There were little ants and other insects that appeared seemingly from beneath the sand.

Making shadows…

I lost my sun glasses more than once! Little tip – the sand gets everywhere and can also scratch the glasses.

The contrast of colours was another delight.

Tiny specks for people in the vast ocean of sand.

I’ll post photos soon of even taller dunes in the Sossusvlei – and that was even a little dangerous! But Dune 45 was definitely the more pleasant experience and one of the most special moments in all of my travels. Being there on top was so magical, and looking down onto the vast plains and dunes below was breathtaking. As is often, photos really don’t do the moment justice.

If you visit Namibia, you have to visit the dunes of the Namib desert and climb Dune 45 (go early in the morning to avoid the heat and always carry water with you!).

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