Almost a year in Zambia – in pictures (Part 3)

Zambia by road

It took a full two days to transfer registration ownership of a charming 1996 Toyota Landcruiser that I bought from a volunteer leaving Zambia. You do (somewhat) get used to these administrative inefficiencies!

Having a break on the side of the Great East Road.

Major roads like the Great East Road are repaired through international donors but many long stretches still have dangerous holes and breaks that mean you really have to be alert and driving slowly.

Crashed and burnt cars were unfortunately a very common sighting. This one still had smoke rising from it. In places like Zambia, a traveler is more likely to die on the road than from diseases like tuberculosis.

I loved driving through small towns and seeing so many people wandering the streets. The bustle and sense of community is really wonderful and contrasts strongly with city life. Evening was especially nice.

Besides pot holes and dangerously steep speed humps, occasionally there were other hazards on the road.

Very frequently you came across fires, but these are started by locals to clear the area, or often by kids to flush out the rats and sell them as food at the markets!

Don’t be alarmed, everything is under control!

I loved driving in Zambia. Everywhere you look were beautiful valleys, hills, rivers or lively rural communities.

It was nice to stop the car and enjoy the scenery.

Most Zambians though can’t afford a car and travel by foot, bike or occasionally other methods!

Road trips were so much fun, and it’s good to have a reliable car to go on adventures. It wasn’t easy saying good bye to my Prado. Despite it’s age, it was a wonderfully comfortable car that had been handed down among volunteers since being imported from Japan years ago. In fact, I’m pretty sure I saw it on a blog from a previous volunteer at Saint Francis Hospital when I was preparing to come out! Hopefully it will be driving more people to fun adventures for many years yet.

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